5:30pm EDT September 27, 2016

Annabelle Selldorf

Werner Seligmann Lecture; Reception follows
Public Spaces and Private Place

Annabelle Selldorf is a 1987 graduate of the Syracuse Architecture Florence M.Arch 2 program. Born and raised in Germany, she received a bachelor of architecture degree from Pratt Institute prior to her master’s study at Syracuse.  She is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and serves on the board of the Architectural League of New York and the Chinati Foundation. In 2014, Selldorf was the recipient of the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ prestigious Award in Architecture. She recently received a 2016 Medal of Honor from the American Institute of Architecture New York City chapter.

Annabelle Selldorf founded architectural design practice Selldorf Architects in 1988.  Now a 65-person firm, Selldorf Architects has worked on public and private projects that range from museums and libraries to a recycling facility, and at scales encompassing large new construction, historic renovations, and exhibition design. Clients include cultural institutions and universities such as the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Neue Galerie New York, Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, and Brown University. In addition, the firm has created numerous galleries for David Zwirner, Hauser & Wirth, and Gladstone Gallery among others, and designed exhibitions for Frieze Masters and the 2013 Venice Art Biennale. A monograph of the firm’s work, “Selldorf Architects: Portfolio and Projects,” published by Phaidon, will be released this spring.

“At a time when architecture seems to be obsessed with grand gestures … the work of Annabelle Selldorf speaks to the transformative power of sculpting space in subtle and dignified ways.” (Carolina A. Miranda, L.A. Times, March 13, 2016)

In her Syracuse lecture Annabelle Selldorf will present recent work by her firm, Selldorf Architects, including the Sims Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility in Brooklyn and Luma Arles, a new center for contemporary art in the South of France.

Full image credits (PDF)